EXIT AND VOICE: MIGRATION, MOBILE PHONE AND WOMEN'S MOBILITY IN BANGLADESH

  • Habibul Haque Khondker

Abstract

In the early years of Bangladesh in the 1970s, the author, an undergraduate student of sociology at Dhaka University, was invited to meet a delegate  of young Americans who came to the newly-independent Bangladesh on a study tour. A young, female anthropologist in the delegation asked the author: why there were so few women seen on the streets of Dhaka. This was not obvious to the author at that time until pointed out by the American woman. The author hesitated with a tentative answer attributing the absence of women in the public to the religious strictures on women's free movement in Bangladesh where Islam was (and is) the dominant religion. And the religious prescription of seclusion (purdah) was restricting the mobility of women. By mid-1980s - in a decade's time - a large number of women were seen in the streets of Dhaka while the dominant religion remained, more or less, unchanged.

Author Biography

Habibul Haque Khondker

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Habibul Haque Khondker is professor in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Zayed University, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. His teaching and research interests cover globalization theories and global modernity. Currently, he is co-President of the Research Committee on Sociology of Development and Social Transformation of the International Sociological Association (ISA).

Published
2018-08-20
How to Cite
Khondker, H. (2018). EXIT AND VOICE: MIGRATION, MOBILE PHONE AND WOMEN’S MOBILITY IN BANGLADESH. The Journal of Development Communication, 26(2), 12. Retrieved from http://jdc.journals.unisel.edu.my/ojs/index.php/jdc/article/view/40