• The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 30 No 1 (2019)

    A farmer on dried loamy soil in Basti Lehar Walla village, Punjab, Pakistan. Due to prolonged drought in parts of the country, rivers are drying up, livestock are decimated and rainfed crop productions are severely affected. Rare species are also threatened and people are struggling to feed themselves. Literally means the land of five rivers, Punjab is the most fertile and most populated province of Pakistan. It plays a leading role in agricultural production, contributing nearly 70% to the annual food grain production in the country. All the provinces of Pakistan have a history of facing major droughts in the past. This prolonged period of drought in recent years has developed into one of the worst disasters in Pakistan, badly affecting food production systems hence the health of community members, especially women and children. 

    Text: Md Sidin Ahmad Ishak | Photo: Courtesy of Alamy Stock Photo

  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 29 No 2 (2018)

    A drone view of a curvy road reflects our main theme in this issue: rural development, communication and technology. Called Transfagarasan, this 150 km long Romanian mountain highway starts at Bascov in southern central Romania and it follows the valley of the River Argea and after mounting to the highest point, it descends to Cartisoara in the Olt Valley where the road ends. As one of the most spectacular roads in the world, the highway climbs, twists and descends through the Fagaras mountains, a part of the Transylvanian Alps, which are very rich in unique wildlife. 

  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 29 No 1 (2018)

    In April 2018, almost 1,200 people gathered in Indonesia for the Summit on Behaviour and Social Change Communication. Practitioners, researchers, donors, and leaders  from more than 400 organisations travelled to Nusa Dua from the Asia Pacific region, Africa, Europe, Latin America, and North America. This issue features ten papers prepared by SUMMIT participants based on their presentations. They cover a range of challenges from using story-telling to help fishermen in Belize deal with threats to their occupations, and influencing adolescent girls and boys in India to address gender discrimination and stereotyping – to the use of social media to change norms regarding babies’ health in Malawi.

  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 28 No 1-2 (2017)
    Since the founding of AIDCOM in 1986 and this journal’s first edition in 1989, its articles have reached into Africa and into countries around the globe, including Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Israel, India, Nepal, Norway, Netherlands, Malaysia, Philippines, Pakistan Singapore, Taiwan, Turkey, Uzbekistan, Thailand, and the USA. Its founding editor Khairul Bashar, who left this earth in 2015, would be happy to see this and future issues of the Journal reaching farther around the globe via the internet ― and raising its original modest circulation from a few hundred to potentially thousands. We anticipate this broader exposure will attract not only new readers but also new contributors.
  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 27 No 2 (2016)

    Beijing Opera or Peking opera, also called “Eastern Opera”, is a principle tradition in Chinese culture. It is called Beijing opera because it was formed in Beijing and has a 200-year history, in which its fountainhead can be dated back to old local operas, especially Anhui. It was born when the “Four Great Anhui Troupe” brought Anhui opera in 1790 to Beijing, for the eightieth birthday of the Qianlong Emperor on September 25. Originally, it was staged for the court officials and emperor and become a traditional art form that turned fashionable among ordinary people later. Performances were watched in tearooms, restaurants, and even around makeshifts stages.

  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 27 No 1 (2016)

    Malaysia, due to its diverse cultural and ethnic heritage, boasts a very rich array of cultural dances. Its unique history – from the Orang Asli, Orang Asal and Malays, later with the Chinese, Indians and Arab who came to trade, and afterwards colonialized by the Portuguese, Dutch and English – resulted in so many dances, where after a while, these dances develop their own local and unique Malaysian identity.

  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 26 No 2 (2015)

    JDC is sad to announce the demise of its Editor, Mr Khairul Bashar. Mr Bashar founded Aidcom in 1986 and since then, the NGO has been a leading voice in development communications through its many trainings, seminars and publications, including this journal. This issue is dedicated to him.

  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 26 No 1 (2015)

    Since the last issue was published, a violent earthquake has devastated Nepal. Instead of cultural depiction, the cover of this issue portrayed an image of devastation. This is because we want to share the grief and trauma of those who are affected.

  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 25 No 1-2 (2014)

    For this issue, we decided to combine articles we received as well as proceeding from a conference Aidcom held in June this year called Engaged Learning and ICT for Development in the University Curriculum. The conference was jointly organised with Unisel in association with Cornell University of the USA, and the UN-APCICT.

  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 24 No 2 (2013)

    Kyrgyz folk dance always attract the attention worldwide. The culture of Kyrgyzstan has a wide mix of ethnic groups and cultures. Bright, colourful and unique costumes, national music of Kyrgyz, choreography of dances appeals to spectators. For a long time in the East, the woman was keeper of a family hearth. In spite of anything, woman is soft and gentle, proud and strong. She understands that wisdom of the world is in her hands. 

  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 24 No 1 (2013)

    Myanmar (formerly known as Burma) is a country in Southeast Asia bordering the Andaman Sea and the Bay of Bengal. A land of hills and valleys rimmed in the north, east and west by mountain ranges forming a giant horseshoe, within which lie flat lands and river valleys where most of the country’s agricultural land and population are concentrated.

  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 23 No 2 (2012)

    National Uzbek dance is very expressive. It presents all the beauty of nation. The main difference of Uzbek dance from dances of other Eastern nations is the accent on complicated and expressive hand gestures and animated facial expressions. Uzbek dance includes two categories: classic traditional dance and folklore dance.

  • The Journal of Development Communication
    Vol 23 No 1 (2012)

    Attan is a form of dance that originated in Afghanistan centuries ago. Performing Attan in open air is a part of the Afghan culture. The dancers usually form a circle by holding each other’s hands. The Attan is accompanied by music especially of drums and pipes. The dance begins slowly but grows in the momentum for one or two hours with breaks for changes in tempo and in song.

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